To find themselves suddenly in kennels without a home and a family is a very stressful event for a dog, and we aim to make the dogs' time with us as stress-free as it can possibly be in the circumstances.

On June 1st this year we restricted public access to our kennels, so that only people looking to rehome a dog now have access. This has reduced the amount of stress under which the dogs were put daily.

Kennel Manager Clare Meir reports that the stress levels, noise, and anxious behaviour have greatly reduced; the dogs are much calmer and more relaxed, as they are able to rest during the day.

Staff are now able to spend more one on one time with the dog and training plans have been developed for them to suit each dog’s individual needs. Shy and nervous dogs are taking noticeably less time to adopt to their new surroundings as the noise level and volume of people coming through has stopped.

Most of the dogs are maintaining a nice healthy weight, as they are no longer pacing and bouncing around their kennels all day. Diarrhoea was prevalent before, due to stress and the amount of treats the public used to feed the dogs - it is very uncommon now, as they have their own set meals and treats and their systems can rest and digest.

The number of successful rehomings is higher this year than for the same period last year. Most people’s response to the closure has been positive, as most dog-lovers understand the move is in the interests of the dogs’ welfare.

If you would like to rehome a dog, you can still come into the kennels and meet the dogs.